What is Ikebana(Kado)?

英語で陶芸
この記事は約7分で読めます。
広告

価格10,780円 (税込) 左側  右側 価格13,200円 (税込)
広告
広告
広告

What is Ikebana(Kado)?

Kado is a traditional Japanese art originating from the Heian period in which flowers and plants are specially arranged in a vase for appreciation.It is also called Ikebana.

Those flowers are usually displayed in Tokonoma (japanese alcove).  

Ikebana began when the Buddhist monk offered flowers in front of a mortuary tablet. 

Flowers and plants in ikebana represent human life and express its beauty and respect.

【趣味で始める陶芸入門】日本の陶芸の歴史~縄文からの変遷を解説
普段私たちが使っている陶磁器の器、一体いつくらいから日本で作られるようになったと思いますか?一万六千年ほど前に始まったとされているんです。縄文土器から現在のような器になるまでには、さまざまな技術の進歩や時代ごとの変化がありました。そんな長い歴史を持つ日本の陶芸の歴史について、順に紐解いていきます。

In Ikebana, flowers also represent heaven, earth and human,which are to be arranged in a proper balance. 

People enjoy seeing the mystic power of plants expressed in the flowers and plants.  

 To Tamotsu Funakoshi style Ikebana

It was traditionally learnt by women as part of bridal training.

There are many styles in Ikebana. 

Based on Ikenobo style, there are about 2000-30000 kinds of styles.Ikenobo style is the base of Ikebana established by Senoh Ikebono. 

Ikenobo Senno made a school of Japanese flower arrangement.

Ikenobo Senno was a buddhist monk who strived to raise the artistic level of flower arrangement.    

There are three patterns ( Rikka, Shoka, Jiyuuka) in Ikenobo style.Ikebana is popular among many generations as enrichment lessons. 

Ikebana uses plants and flowers as Yorishiro (an object representative of a devine spirit).Ikebana exhibitions are held at exhibition spaces, post offices and train stations. 

【趣味で始める陶芸入門】陶磁器の見方、選び方、使い方のポイント
焼き物と一口に言っても陶器や磁器、炻器など、様々な種類があります。普段は何気なく使っているその食器、陶器か磁器かによって特徴がありますし、使うときやお手入れで注意したいポイントがあるんです。せっかく手に入れた器を長くきれいに使っていくためにも、その特徴と使うときの注意点を覚えておきましょう!

Rikka(立花 in japanese )

Rikka is a technique of putting plants and flowers in a long and narrow vertical vase. 

Rikka is the basic form of Ikebana .

Rikka mainly represent beauty of landscape and the universe. 

Rikka represent providence of nature. 

SHOKA(生花 IN JAPANESE )

Shoka focuses on the beauty of birth, when plants start sprouting. 

Shoka represents the growing energy and feeling of life.   

Jiyuuka(自由花in japanese )

There are not any fixed styles in Jiyuuka. With Jiyuuka style, wide ranges of expression are available. 

Jiyuuka style is used in many interpretations of events.  

Manners

First, Seiza(sitting position where feet are folded under thighs) in front of the alcove of the room, then bow once towards the flower before seeing. 

See the overall structure first, followed by arrangement of the flowers, floral vase and garden tub. 

Then enjoy the moment.

Lastly, bow to the person who put together the ikebana, showing the gratitude. 

【趣味で始める陶芸入門】日本の陶磁器の産地~六古窯+25ヶ所を紹介
日本には、六古窯(ろっこよう)と呼ばれる陶磁器の産地があり、中世(平安時代〜室町時代)に始まり現在もなお生産が続いている越前・瀬戸・常滑・信楽・丹波・備前の6つの産地を指します。古くから焼き物の町として栄え、その伝統が受け継がれている地域です。それ以外で伝統的工芸品に指定されている陶磁器の産地は25ヶ所あります。

In Ikebana, flowers, grasses, trees, and all different kinds of plants are used. In Ikebana, flowers and plants are pierced with a needle called a “kenzan”. 

The flower arrangements are then placed into a water absorbent sponge which is called an “oasis”. In Ikebana, attention is also paid to the space in which the arrangements are to be placed. 

The result is quite different from using a flower arrangementwhere the look of the space isn’t considered.   

Flower arrangement called Kado is a traditional Japanese artthat has flourished since the sixteenth century. 

Also called Ikebana, its origin is said to date from the sixth centurywhen Buddhist priests offered up flowers before Buddha. 

Its fundamental concept is to express the three elements of heaven, earth,and mankind in a balanced composition, using natural flowers.

The general style is to fill a wide-mouthed, simple vase with water,and stick and heap up the flowers on kenzan, that is a metallic plate with a lot of thick needles pointing upwards. 

Natural beauty and one’s feelings are expressed by using scissorsto adjust the length of the stems and to modify the shape of the leavesand by using the hands to add curvature.

Today, avant-garde Ikebana that does not even use plants is one genre of the art.